Archive for September 2006

First Perl Poem

September 28, 2006

#!/usr/bin/perl
use LifeMission::Live;
use File::Find;

@Life::ISA = qw(Short_Journey);
do {
find(&your_call, @in_life) and live $it;
}

Lino

Still looking for a Granular Computing Implementation with Perl

September 25, 2006

As I mentioned before, I asked my fellow Perl Monks for leads on Granular Computing Implementations using Perl. So far, I have not had any luck 😦 On the bright side, the question bumped up my experience (XP) points and now I have 39 points (11 points away from achieving the next Perl Monks’ category -Acolyte). The node was also displayed on the PerlMonks‘ home page on September 25.

I will give it a week, if I do not get any lead on Granular Computing with Perl, I will start planing the coding of a CPAN module.

Peace!

Lino

First Perl Monks’ Node and becoming a Perl Monks Novice

September 24, 2006

In this node, I asked for help in locating Granular Computing implementations using Perl. I am still waiting for some leads in that sense (I hope to find someone else working on that to share experiences). If you know about any implementation, I would love to hear about it, so, please, drop me a line.

 

By the way, I guess that people liked the idea of a Granular Computing implementation in Perl. Maybe because of that they rated so well my node (It was one of the 10 best rated nodes of September 24, 2006). Also, on September 24, I went from 4 XP points to 23 XP points (XP is a number used to rate the Perl Monks‘ experience) moving me from the 1st category (Initiate) to the 2nd one (Novice). I guess that it is not bad for someone that has been programming in Perl for less than two months.

 

Peace!

 

Lino

My first steps with Perl!

September 22, 2006

By the end of OSCON, Alejandro had convinced me that I should try Perl. So I decide to buy a couple of books to get started. If you are curious, I bought Learning Perl (the Llama book) and Mastering Algorithms with Perl. By the end of July, I started learning. Maybe it is just me, but I found Perl to be an easy to learn language (I did a lot of assembly and C programming before). On August, I made a decision: I would code an important portion of my Research work in Perl. That is me, very passionate some times.

To help me with this task, I bought another book (this time it was the Alpaca book –Intermediate Perl) and joined the Perl Monks. After reading a bit of the book (I have not had the time to finish it), I started to port some code that I had in MATLAB to Perl. I decided to start with one of my favorites: a Fuzzy C-Means implementation. You can see it on my Perl Monks’ scratchpad. It works! By the way, if you are a Perl’s expert and have a suggestion or two on how to improve my code, feel free to drop me a line. Remember: I have been programming in Perl for less than two months.

Peace!

Lino

OSCON Recap Part III

September 22, 2006

Here is the last part describing my first visit to OSCON. Before I start, I have to thank O’Reilly for giving us the opportunity to talk about the Venezuela’s quest to achieve technological independence. Second, I have to thank Jeff for the invitation and his hospitality. And of course, I have to thank Chris for letting me stay at his place.

On Friday we gave our talk to a group of social activists in Portland. It went quite well: Alejandro had plenty of time to give his portion of the talk 😉

People were quite engaged and we hope the message went across. The audio of the talk is available here thanks to Chris.

Finally, I leave you with the note inviting to our talk

Peace!

Lino

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OSCON Recap Part II

September 22, 2006

I have been so busy with my research and helping organize the 4th World Forum on Free Knowledge that I did not have the time to write down my thoughts about OSCON until now. Anyway, I will do my best to give you a short description of what our session was about.

Our session name was: Sofware Libre: FOSS in Venezuela. We had a decent number of attendants considering that we were targeting people interested in the social aspects of Free and Open Source Software in a conference where the business aspects were king.

Jeff gave a not so brief introduction to the Venezuela’s efforts to move to free and open source software and then I started my talk. Some how I got carried away and started talking for a longer time than we agreed to. This left little time to Alejandro to talk about the project he is working on to make more human-friendly the prisons in our country.

In short, we got some nice reviews, specially this one. We hope people enjoyed the talk while learning about what is happening in Venezuela and how that relates to the global Free and Open Source Software movement.

For those interested, I posted the slides of my talk here.

Peace!

Lino